Potential of Rain Water Harvesting to Address Water Logging Problem: Case Study Senpara Porbota, Mirpur

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Submitted By ATabassum
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Pages 3
Potential of Rain Water Harvesting to Address Water Logging Problem: Case Study Senpara Porbota, Mirpur
By
Anika Tabassum
Student, Department of Urban and Regional Planning
Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET)
Email: t_anika@yahoo.com

Fuad Hasan Ovi
Student, Department of Urban and Regional Planning
Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET)
Email: ovi_buet07@yahoo.com

Md. Abu Hanif
Student, Department of Urban and Regional Planning
Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET)
Email: hanif07buet@yahoo.com

Ishrat Islam, PhD.
Associate Professor
Dept. of Urban & Regional Planning
Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET)
Email: ishrat_urp@yahoo.com

Abstract:
The population of Dhaka City is increasing at a rapid pace than ever before. Due to ever increasing population pressure along with the causes and consequences of global warming; the environment of the city is degrading and the weather parameters are adversely challenged. The baseline temperature, precipitation and relative humidity are shifted and eventually accentuated due to changes in the climate system. A massive shift in the days with rainfall and days without rainfall results in water logging as well as water scarcity. This study primarily focuses on water logging problem of Dhaka city during monsoon (May to October) season. Water logging is such an acute problem for the inhabitants of Dhaka city that disrupts the traffic movement and create health, hygiene and environmental problem in the life of the city dwellers. The causes of the problem are manifold. Among the natural causes; erratic behavior of rainfall is at the top. And among the manmade consequences; unplanned urbanization, increased paved surfaces, destruction of natural landscape like water bodies and green spaces, sediment deposition in storm…...

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