Lesson from Radical Leadership

In: Business and Management

Submitted By aliapis
Words 312
Pages 2
“Treat people like adult, and they will respond like adults”

This is the philosophy of Ricardo Semler, which is used to build the business Semco Group with great leadership management. Ricardo Semler that only one person breaks all the traditional rules of leadership and making their own rules. Other business also can belief and follow this philosophy because can improve and more positive in leadership management to build great management. Every people have their own ego, so if we serve them with proper or right method they also will give good feedback. Example the employees was done wrong step in production, so the manager reprimand and correcting them with right way not to anger to them. So the employees will accept the reprimand and remind the step also, indirectly the production will increase and more quality will produce. In this situation the employee easier and more comfort to working with this environment.

In the modern life style, every people have their own behaviour that different with each other. Ricardo Semler belief that the “organization thrive best by entrusting employees to apply their creativity and ingenuity in service of the whole enterprise, and to make important decisions close to the flow of work, conceivably include the selection and election of their bosses”. Good environments of working also paste a role to contribute more quality in production. Ricardo Semler wants all our people to feel free to change and adapt their working area as they please. Example, painting the wall or machine, adding plant or decorate their working space is up to employee with their own tastes. It can make our employee more comfortable and love also passion to working. The company has no rules about this and doesn’t want to have any. Change the area around you according to your taste and desires and of the people who work with…...

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