Lemurs in Madagascar

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Associate Level Material

Lemurs in Madagascar Assignment

View the “Lemurs in Madagascar – Surviving on an Island of Change” video.

Using the information found in this video, and in Ch. 5 and 6 of Visualizing Environmental Science, answer the following questions in 25 to 100 words each.

1. What are Madagascar’s biomes? Discuss the major features of at least one of these biomes. Use the textbook for biome examples. Madagascar’s biomes are tropical rain forest, tropical dry forest, and savanna. One feature of the tropical rain forest biome is its temperature, which is usually warm year around with precipitation daily. This biome has three layers. The first layer is where you can find the tops of trees. The second layer, or canopy layer, is where you will find a vast amount of leaves that let only a small amount of sunlight in. The last layer is the ground layer of the rainforest which is usually clear of vegetation because of the amount of light that is blocked by the canopy layer.

2. What changes happening in Madagascar are posing challenges for lemurs? Give details about the sources, time scale, and types of change.
The changes happening in Madagascar that are posing challenges for lemurs is due mostly to the destruction of tropical rainforest by humans than by evolutionary change. Some lemurs, such as the bamboo lemur, eat leaves from tree. As the trees are cut down and the tropical rainforests are destroyed, these species of lemurs will lose their source of vegetation.

3. Which types of lemurs are adapting to the changes? Which types of lemurs are not adapting well? Why?
The type of lemurs are adapting to change are the ones who does well in secondary habitats that have been altered by humans. An example of a lemur that are adapting to the change is the ring-tailed Lemur. Ring-tailed lemurs use the crops of the people of Madagascar…...

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