Fii in India

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Impact of Foreign Institutional Investors on Indian Stock Market
Posted Date: Total Responses: 0 Posted By: hardeep Member Level: Silver Points/Cash: 10 | |
CHAPTER I

INTRODUCTION

1.1 INTRODUCTION

1.1.1 FOREIGN INSTITUTIONAL INVESTORS

FII is defined as an institution organized outside of India for the purpose of making investments into the Indian securities market under the regulations prescribed by SEBI.
‘FII’ include “Overseas pension funds, mutual funds, investment trust, asset management company, nominee company, bank, institutional portfolio manager, university funds, endowments, foundations, charitable trusts, charitable societies, a trustee or power of attorney holder incorporated or established outside India proposing to make proprietary investments or investments on behalf of a broad-based fund. FIIs can invest their own funds as well as invest on behalf of their overseas clients registered as such with SEBI. These client accounts that the FII manages are known as ‘sub-accounts’. A domestic portfolio manager can also register itself as an FII to manage the. funds of sub-accounts

Foreign institutional investor means an entity established…...

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