Elvis, R&R, and Society

In: Film and Music

Submitted By blatchpw
Words 976
Pages 4
We have studied many different aspects and artists of Rock and Roll this semester in MMC 1702; however, the part that I found by far the most interesting is the material on Elvis Presley. More than two decades after his passing, the presence of Elvis is as prominent in our society as if he were still alive. He is known only by his first name, and that name is quoted in numerous references in today’s world (“bigger than Elvis!” etc). Elvis’ impact reaches far, far beyond his music. This is a fact that differentiates him from so many of the other notable artists in history. However, his music alone has had a great personal impact on me, and at the time of its release, changed the industry more than anyone had ever seen. He single-handedly popularized rock and roll by blending white country music with black rhythm and blues. He made his music fun to listen to and acceptable to listen to by everybody, no matter what race you were. After studying this, I’ve realized how much Elvis has changed my life. The “creation” of rock and roll has had an impact on so many artists in every single genre. Music has always been a big part of my life, and I enjoy tastes in country, rhythm and blues, and rock (in today’s usage of the terms). Furthermore, the creation of rock and roll among other things has helped spurred on the development of an international pop culture. This pop culture, through magazines, newspapers, television, and other forms of media has shaped the youth of America for almost 50 years. I was not aside from this, and remember myself spending summers watching “TRL” on MTV or trying to emulate someone I thought was cool on a channel such as MTV or VH1. By bringing black music to mainstream America, Elvis made it OK for people to be influenced by any type of music, and furthermore allowed the creation of pop culture to take place where it was difficult…...

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