Companies in Basel

In: Other Topics

Submitted By taifood86
Words 406
Pages 2
Roche, Novartis and UBS
Syngenta which the Financial Times includes in its FT Global 500 Index as one of the most important companies worldwide

Pharmaceuticals, Biotechnology & Life Sciences
 4-Antibody
 Acino
 Actelion
 Aerosol-Service AG
 Bachem
 Basilea
 Beiersdorf
 Bühlmann Laboratories
 Carbogen AMCIS
 Cimex
 CIS Pharma
 DSM Nutritional Products AG
 Evolva
 Gaba
 Genedata
 Inotech
 Karger
 Lonza
 Mepha
 MondoBIOTECH
 Novartis
 Pentapharm
 Permamed
 Polyphor
 Proreo Pharma
 RCC Ltd.
 Roche
 Santhera
 S.L.A. Pharma
 SwissCo Services
 Swiss Pharma Contract
 Syngenta
 Synosia
 Tillots Pharma AG
 Triplan
 Vivendy Therapeutics
 Weleda
 Xenometrix

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Chemicals & Nanotechnology
 Acino
 Bachem
 Clariant
 Concentris
 Lonza
 Nanosurf
 Rohner Chem
 Rolic
 Solvias
 Swiss Nanoscience Institute
 Zeptosens
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Agribusiness & Food
 Bell AG
 Bio.inspecta AG
 DSM Nutritional Products
 Feldschlösschen
 Jungbunzlauer
 Louis Ditzler AG
 Ricola
 Syngenta
Medical Technology * Camlog * Medartis * NaviSwiss * SIC invent AG Switzerland * Straumann * Synthes * Thommen Medical
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Commerce & Logistics * 4PL Central Station * AMAC Aerospace * Bardusch AG * Coop * Davidoff * Densa AG * Dolder * Dufry * Fracht * General Transport * Gondrand * Haecky Import * Hello * Leimgruber * MAT Transport * Messe Schweiz * Panalpina * Papierhof Rheinfelden AG * SBB Cargo * Spedag * Swiss International Air Lines *…...

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